VOLUME 44, NUMBER 3, 1996

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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica 44 (3) (1996)

CONTENTS

Animal breeding

Age-related changes in scrotal circumference of Hungarian Simmental bulls in self-performance test.

Tőzsér, J., Mézes, M., Süpek, Z., Nagy, Anna and Nagy, N.

263

Evaluation of the GnRH test results of beef-type breeding bull candidates.

Tőzsér, J., Mézes, M. and Szakács, Zs.

269

Infectious diseases

Occurrence of Listeria and listeriosis in Hungary.

Ralovich, B. and Domján-Kovács, Hajnalka

277

Mycoplasmal pneumonia in pigs in Croatia: first evaluation of a vaccine in fattening pigs.

Bilić, V., Lipej, Z., Valpotić, I., Habrun, B., Humski, A. and Njari, B.

287

Parasitology

Remarks on the morphology, site of infection and validity of some coccidian species from fish.

Molnár, K.

295

Reproduction

Influence of a deficient intake of high and low degradable protein on body composition, metabolic adaptation, production and reproductive performance in early lactation dairy cows.

Fekete, S., Huszenicza, G., Kellems, R. O., Szakáll, I., Fébel, Hedvig, Husvéth, F., Nagy, P., Kulcsár, Margit, Kósa, Emma, Gaál, T., Rudas, P. and Oppel, Klára

309

An investigation on plasma progesterone levels during pregnancy and at parturition in the Ivesi sheep. 

Kalkan, C., Çetin, H., Kaygusuzoglu, E., Yilmaz, B., Çiftçi, M., Yildiz, H., Yildiz, A., Deveci, H.,  Apaydin, A. M. and Öcal, H.

335

Surgery

Experimental transduodenal diathermic sphincterotomy in pigs.

Szewczyk, T., Brzeski, W. and Peterlejtner, T.

341

Studies on end-to-end colonic anastomosis in the dog: a comparison of techniques.

Athar, M., Chaudhry, N. I., Shakoor, A. and Khan, M. A.

349

Clinical perspectives of intravenous ketamine anaesthesia in peafowl (Pavo cristatus).

Athar, M., Shakoor, A., Muhammad, G., Sarwar, M. N. and Chaudhry, N. I.

357

Toxicology

Toxicity of the herbicides Flubalex, Fusilade S and Maloran 50 WP to chicken embryos after administration as single compounds or in combination.

Várnagy, L., Varga, T., Hlubik, I., Budai, P. and Molnár, E.

363

The effect of phenyl mercury on reproductive performance in laying hens.

Pribilincová, Jana, Marettová, Elena, Košucký , J. and Maretta, M.

377

Virology

Restriction site mapping of a bovine adenovirus type 10 strain.

Matiz, Katalin, Benkő, Mária, Zádori, Z. and Harrach, B.

389

Book Review                                                                       

395

Coming Events

397


Acta Veterinaria Hungarica 44 (3), pp. 263-–267 (1996)

AGE-RELATED CHANGES IN SCROTAL CIRCUMFERENCE OF HUNGARIAN SIMMENTAL BULLS IN SELF-PERFORMANCE TEST

J. Tőzsér1, M. Mézes2, Z. Süpek1, Anna Nagy1 and N. Nagy1

1Institute of Animal Husbandry, Gödöllő University of Agricultural Sciences, H–2103 Gödöllő, Páter K. u. 1, Hungary; 
2Department of Nutrition, Gödöllő University of Agricultural Sciences, H–2103 Gödöllő, Hungary

(Received March 12, 1996; accepted July 10, 1996)

Between 1989 and 1992, investigations were carried out on a total of 164 young Hungarian Simmental bulls of different age at central performance test-ing stations and on farms (field test) to measure the scrotal circumference of bulls and describe its relationships with age and body weight. An age-related increase was found in average scrotal circumference in the populations studied. Average scrotal circumference of Hungarian Simmental bulls was 17.86 cm at 5 months of age and 37.06–37.72 cm at 13–14 months of age. The coefficient of correlation between age and scrotal circumference was between r = 0.31 and r = 0.40, while that between scrotal circumference and body weight varied between r = 0.35 and r = 0.59. The partial regression coefficients for age and body weight showed values of r = 0.003–0.063 and r = 0.017–0.032, respectively. The multiple coefficient of correlation was between R = 0.47 and R = 0.59.

Key words: Breeding bulls, body weight, development, scrotal circumference


Acta Veterinaria Hungarica 44 (3), pp. 269–-275 (1996)

EVALUATION OF THE GnRH TEST RESULTS OF BEEF-TYPE BREEDING BULL CANDIDATES

J. Tőzsér1, M. Mézes2 and Zs. Szakács1

1Institute of Animal Husbandry, and 2Department of Nutrition, Gödöllő University 
of Agricultural Sciences, H–2103 Gödöllő, Páter K. u. 1, Hungary

(Received March 12, 1996; accepted July 10, 1996)

The GnRH test results of Hungarian Fleckvieh and Charolais breeding bull candidates were evaluated by two different methods (selection based on previously fixed standard data and on standard deviation, respectively) in two breeding herds. The Leydig’s cell response of the testicles to a central signal after the injection of a single dose of 100 m g exogenous GnRH analogue (Ovurelin inj. ad us. vet., Reanal Co. Ltd., Budapest) was evaluated. The two different selection methods used for evaluating the results of the GnRH test brought different results: on the basis of phenotypic value three, while according to the absolute value seven Hungarian Fleckvieh individuals were selected as excellent. For the evaluation of the results of GnRH treatment, the phenotypic deviation value should be used in the practice because of its easy interpretation. The relative phenotypic values changed between 84.4 and 136.6 in the Hungarian Fleckvieh and between 64.7 and 179.4 in the Charolais breed.

Key words: Bull, GnRH test, selection, testosterone


Acta Veterinaria Hungarica 44 (3), pp. 277-–285 (1996)

OCCURRENCE OF LISTERIA AND LISTERIOSIS IN HUNGARY*

B. RALOVICH1 and Hajnalka DOMJÁN-KOVÁCS2

1Ministry of Welfare, H–1361 Budapest, P.O. Box 1; 2National Food Investigation 
Institute, H–1095 Budapest, Mester u. 81, Hungary

(Received August 1, 1996; accepted September 24, 1996)

Listeriosis is a rare human disease in Hungary. The number of cases is slowly increasing. Only sporadic events have been observed but the occurrence of epidemic listeriosis may be supposed. The Listeria monocytogenes (in abbreviation: L. m.) transmitter role of food in human infections has not yet been verified. The epidemiological character of animal listeriosis is different. Healthy carriers can be found among both humans and animals. Foodstuffs of animal as well as plant origin may be contaminated with Listeria. When the processing technology and/or hygienic conditions are not satisfactory, these microorganisms can be detected in food factories and in final products of the food industry.

Key words: Listeria, human and animal listeriosis, surveillance, food, contamination, listeriosis in Hungary

*Part of this paper was presented at the 12th International Symposium on Problems of Listeriosis in Perth, Australia, in 1995.


Acta Veterinaria Hungarica 44 (3), pp. 287–-293 (1996)

MYCOPLASMAL PNEUMONIA IN PIGS IN CROATIA: FIRST EVALUATION OF A VACCINE IN FATTENING PIGS

V. BILIĆ1, Z. LIPEJ1, I. VALPOTIĆ2, B. HABRUN1, A. HUMSKI1 and B. NJARI3

1Croatian Veterinary Institute, Department of Bacteriology and Department 
of Pathology, 10000 Zagreb, Savska c. 143, Croatia; 2Department of Biology and 3Department of Hygiene and Technology of Animal Foodstuffs, Veterinary Faculty, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb, Heinzelova 55, Croatia

(Received March 7, 1996; accepted July 15, 1996)

The immunoprophylaxis of mycoplasmal pneumonia of swine (MPS) caused by Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae was investigated for the first time in fattening pigs in Croatia. The incidence of MPS was monitored in pigs weighing on average 27.5 kg (12 weeks old) after immunization with a M. hyopneumoniae vaccine. Of 350 pigs in each group, in the nonvaccinated group 55 animals (15.7%) were affected by pneumonia and 11 (3.1%) died of consequences of pneumonia, whereas in the vaccinated group 20 pigs (5.7%) were affected by pneumonia without any death due to the infection. In the nonvaccinated group 44% more pigs were individually treated with antibiotic, and these animals received in-feed therapy for more than 1/4 of the fattening period. Vaccinated pigs gained weight faster, at the rate of 0.745 kg/day (or 82 g/day more) than control animals. The mean score of lung lesions due to M. hyopneumoniae was 10.51 in the control pigs and only 0.54 in the vaccinated animals. The total tissue alterations on lungs due to M. hyopneumoniae, Pasteurella multocida and/or Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae expressed as the mean score were 13.21 in the control group and 2.98 in the vaccinated group. According to the results of evaluation of the M. hyopneumoniae vaccine in the field, the vaccine appeared to provide an adequate immunity in fattening pigs but was less effective when administered to younger pigs at 1–3 weeks of age.

Key words: Mycoplasmal pneumonia, immunoprophylaxis, fattening pigs


Acta Veterinaria Hungarica 44 (3), pp. 295–-307 (1996)

REMARKS ON THE MORPHOLOGY, SITE OF INFECTION AND VALIDITY OF SOME COCCIDIAN SPECIES FROM FISH

K. Molnár

Veterinary Medical Research Institute, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H–1581 
Budapest, P.O. Box 18, Hungary

(Received August 3, 1996; accepted September 23, 1996)

The morphological identification of carpelli-type oocysts of Goussia species parasitizing the gut of different cyprinids is unreliable. Species similar in shape and size can be differentiated only by cross-infection experiments. Goussia scardinii (Pellérdy et Molnár, 1968), developing in the renal tubules of cyprinids, is a synonym of Goussia leucisci (Shulman et Zaika, 1964). The morphology and location hitherto assumed to be species characteristics of G. scardinii can be explained by the aging of oocysts and the type of host reaction. Eimeria rutili Dogiel et Bychowsky, 1938 is a coccidian parasite occurring in various organs of the roach. Its oocysts can be found in the blood vessels and, thus, also in the gill capillaries. Eimeria branchiphila Dyková, Lom et Grupcheva, 1983, described from blood vessels of the gills of the same fish species, should be regarded as a synonym of E. rutili. The Octosporella species described from fish are based on erroneous identification and should be considered nomina nuda. Similarly, the Eimeria and Isospora species described from fish by Davronov in 1987 should also be regarded as nomina nuda, as they appear to be avian or mammalian coccidia that entered the intestinal tract of fish with food. The sporocyst residua of fish coccidia cannot be used as characters suitable for species identification, as they tend to change with oocyst aging.

Key words: Fish coccidia, Eimeria, Goussia, synonyms and development of fish coccidia, host reaction, site of infection


Acta Veterinaria Hungarica 44 (3), pp. 309–-333 (1996)

INFLUENCE OF A DEFICIENT INTAKE OF HIGH AND LOW DEGRADABLE PROTEIN
ON BODY COMPOSITION, METABOLIC ADAPTATION, PRODUCTION AND REPRODUCTIVE PERFORMANCE IN EARLY LACTATION DAIRY COWS

S. Fekete1, G. Huszenicza1, R. O. Kellems2, I. Szakáll1, Hedvig Fébel3, F. Husvéth4, P. Nagy1, Margit Kulcsár1, Emma Kósa1, T. Gaál1, P. Rudas1 and Klára Oppel5

1University of Veterinary Science, H–1400 Budapest, P.O. Box 2, Hungary; 2Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, U. S. A.; 3Research Institute for Animal Breeding and Nutrition, H–2053 Herceghalom, Hungary; 4Pannon University of Agricultural Sciences, Georgikon Faculty, Keszthely, Hungary; 5Gödöllő University of Agricultural Sciences, Gödöllő, Hungary

(Received August 22, 1996; accepted October 6, 1996)

High-yielding dairy cows (n = 34) were divided into high (HD) and low (LD) protein degradability groups after delivery, and used for a feeding trial which lasted up to day 80 ą 10 of lactation. The cows were regularly weighed, their body condition was scored (BCS), and their reproductive status assessed. Blood samples were taken simultaneously, and ruminal fluid was collected on the last day of the trial. On postpartum day 45 ą 6 and 11 days thereafter two prostaglandin F2a (PGF2a ) injections were administered. The ammonia and urea concentrations of the ruminal fluid were higher in cows of group HD. The C2:C3 ratio was 2.7:1 vs. 2.3:1 in HD and LD cows, respectively. The amino acid and lipid composition of blood reflected the dietary treatments. The BCS and blood urea concentration were slightly higher in HD animals. The average daily milk production of LD cows was 1.5 kg higher than that of HD cows. The pregnancy rates of the two groups at day 200 after calving did not differ, but LD cows showed their first visible oestrus and reconceived significantly (p < 0.05) later. It can be concluded that — at a marginal energy supply — a moderate (13%) deficiency of rumen-degradable protein during the first 10 weeks after calving can be more detrimental to reproductive performance than a severe (27%) deficiency of undegradable protein.

Key words: Protein degradability, blood and ruminal fluid parameters, body condition, body composition, urea space, progesterone profile, conception rate, postpartum period


Acta Veterinaria Hungarica 44 (3), pp. 335–-340 (1996)

AN INVESTIGATION ON PLASMA PROGESTERONE LEVELS DURING PREGNANCY 
AND AT PARTURITION IN THE IVESI SHEEP

C. KALKAN, H. ÇETIN, E. KAYGUSUZOGLU, B. YILMAZ*, M. ÇIFTÇI, H. YILDIZ,
A. YILDIZ, H. DEVECI, A. M. APAYDIN and H. ÖCAL

Firat University, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Obstetrics 
and Gynaecology, 23159 Elazig, Turkey

(Received July 2, 1996; accepted September 30, 1996)

In this study, plasma progesterone concentrations in a total of 45 Ivesi sheep were investigated during pregnancy and at parturition. Blood samples were collected from all the sheep studied every 20 days commencing on the 30th day of pregnancy. Plasma progesterone levels were determined by radioimmunoassay. During the second half of the pregnancy, progesterone concentrations in the sheep giving birth to one, two and three lambs were 2.02 ¹ 0.08 ng/ml, 3.24 ¹ 1.18 ng/ml and 4.90 ¹ 0.85 ng/ml, respectively. There was no significant variation in progesterone levels between sheep with male and female offspring. At parturition, plasma progesterone concentrations did not differ significantly between the animals. The present results indicate that plasma progesterone levels could be used not only to determine the pregnancy status of the animal but also to predict the number of fetuses after the second half of the pregnancy.

Key words: Sheep, progesterone, pregnancy, fetuses, parturition

*Present address and address for correspondence: Bayram Yilmaz, University of Glasgow, Institute of Biomedical and Life Sciences, West Medical Building, Glasgow G12 8QQ, U. K.


Acta Veterinaria Hungarica 44 (3), pp. 341–-348 (1996)

EXPERIMENTAL TRANSDUODENAL DIATHERMIC SPHINCTEROTOMY IN PIGS

T. SZEWCZYK1, W. BRZESKI2* and T. PETERLEJTNER1

1Department of General Surgery, Municipal Hospital and 2Department of Surgery and Radiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Academy of Agriculture and Technology, 10–179 Olsztyn, Poland

(Received April 8, 1996; accepted July 16, 1996)

Transduodenal diathermic sphincterotomy was performed in nine pigs of the Large White breed, weighing 70–80 kg. The Erbotom T 400 diathermy unit equipped with a needle knife was used to incise the duodenal papilla and its sphincter. The animals were divided into three groups and the results of the operation were estimated 2, 8 and 12 weeks after surgery. After the respective survival period was over, the animals were examined post mortem to macroscopically inspect the surgery site and take samples for histopathological and histochemical investigations. Histopathological preparations were stained with haematoxylin and eosin as well as by Hale-Müller’s or Frankel’s methods. Histochemical investigations were performed to determine the activity of three enzymes: alkaline phosphatase, acid phosphatase and succinate dehydrogenase. The present study has revealed that diathermic incision of the duodenal papilla and its sphincter gives very good results as confirmed by the findings of macroscopic as well as histopathological and histochemical investigations.

Key words: Duodenal papilla, sphincterotomy, diathermy, pig

*to whom reprint requests should be addressed


Acta Veterinaria Hungarica 44 (3), pp. 349–-356 (1996)

STUDIES ON END-TO-END COLONIC ANASTOMOSIS IN THE DOG: A COMPARISON OF TECHNIQUES

M. ATHAR*, N. I. CHAUDHRY, A. SHAKOOR and M. A. KHAN

Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Science, 
University of Agriculture, Faisalabad 38040, Pakistan

(Received November 6, 1995; accepted July 17, 1996)

For end-to-end anastomosis, many techniques suitable for the small intestine end up catastrophically when applied on the colon. An experimental study involving 18 healthy adult dogs was conducted to find a model technique out of the best considered techniques for small intestinal end-to-end anastomosis viz., simple interrupted approximating sutures (group I), double-layer inverting sutures (group II), and Gambee sutures (group III). The results depicted a non-significant difference among groups as far as paralytic ileus and omental adhesions are concerned. Similarly, haematologic and physiologic values did not deviate from a normal pattern after any surgical intervention. Barium sulphate radiographs taken at postoperation (PO) day 14 revealed significantly lesser reduction (P L 0.001) in lumen diameter (26.14 ¹ 1.87%) at the site of anastomosis in group I as compared to 30.16 ¹ 1.20% and 38.91 ¹ 1.87% reduction in groups III and II, respectively. Similarly, gain in tensile strength was maximum (26.55 ¹ 1.33%) in group I and minimum (19.73 ¹ 2.62%) in group II on PO day 14. The current study showed superiority of the simple interrupted suture technique for colonic end-to-end anastomosis over the other two techniques studied.

Key words: Anastomosis, end-to-end, suture techniques, colon, dog

*The submitted paper is part of the principal author’s M. Sc. (Hons.) thesis.


Acta Veterinaria Hungarica 44 (3), pp. 357-–361 (1996)

CLINICAL PERSPECTIVES OF INTRAVENOUS KETAMINE ANAESTHESIA IN PEAFOWL (PAVO CRISTATUS)

M. ATHAR1, A. SHAKOOR1, G. MUHAMMAD1, M. N. SARWAR2 and N. I. CHAUDHRY1

1Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad 38040, Pakistan; 2Bio-Vet Laboratories Pakistan, Faisalabad 38040, Pakistan

(Received September 15, 1995; accepted March 12, 1996)

A total of 29 peafowl (Pavo cristatus), rectified surgically for infraorbital abscesses (n = 22), lacerated wounds (n = 4), and fractures of tibia (n = 2) and radius (n = 1), were anaesthetized by the intravenous administration of ketamine hydrochloride (Inj. Calypsol, Gedeon Richter, Hungary) in a dose of 15–20 mg/kg body weight. Divided doses (10 mg + 5 mg + 5 mg) were used with an interval of 1–2 min. No premedication was undertaken in any of the birds. Anaesthesia lasted for about 15 min and the birds gained their feet completely after 30 min to 3 hours. The respiration rate was markedly depressed (8–10/min) and the respiratory pattern was deep abdominal. Only a slight increase was observed in the heart rate. Analgesia was incomplete and muscle relaxation was not satisfactory. Mild salivation was also noticed in some of the birds (n = 3). Recovery, although not smooth, was uneventful.

Key words: Avian anaesthesia, anaesthesia, peafowl, ketamine, surgery


Acta Veterinaria Hungarica 44 (3), pp. 363–-376 (1996)

TOXICITY OF THE HERBICIDES FLUBALEX, FUSILADES AND MALORAN 50 WP TO CHICKEN EMBRYOS AFTER ADMINISTRATION AS SINGLE COMPOUNDS 
OR IN COMBINATION

L. VÁRNAGY1, T. VARGA1, I. HLUBIK2, P. BUDAI1 and E. MOLNÁR1

1Department of Agrochemical Hygiene, Institute of Plant Protection, Georgikon Faculty, Pannon University of Agricultural Sciences, H–8361 Keszthely, P.O. Box 71, Hungary; 2Faculty of Agriculture, Gödöllő University of Agricultural Sciences, Gödöllő, Hungary

(Received June 18, 1996; accepted July 12, 1996)

The teratogenic effects of three herbicides (Flubalex, Fusilade S and Maloran 50 WP) were studied in chicken embryos. Each of the three test substances was administered on days 0 and 12 of incubation. Treatment was followed by evaluation on day 19. The compounds were injected into the air-chamber of eggs at three different concentrations. The medium concentration corresponded to that usually applied in chemical plant protection. In order to determine the combined toxicity of the three herbicides, the medium concentration of Maloran 50 WP and three different concentrations of Flubalex or Fusilade S each were administered simultaneously at a final volume of 0.1 ml per egg, at similar times. Evaluation was done on day 19. In tests of individual toxicity, after injection on day 0 of incubation Maloran 50 WP and Flubalex caused a significant reduction in body mass, while Maloran 50 WP and Fusilade S resulted in marked embryonic mortality. After injection on day 12, the medium and the highest concentration of Flubalex and the highest concentration of Fusilade S caused a marked increase in embryonic mortality. The developmental anomalies were of sporadic nature: their incidence increased only after Flubalex treatment, irrespective of the time of administration. The combined administration of Maloran 50 WP and Flubalex on day 0 resulted in a significant or marked body mass reduction in all groups. Embryonic mortality increased substantially after treatment with the highest dose of Flubalex, while all three concentrations of the other two herbicides led to similar results. When treatment was performed on day 12, the two highest concentrations of Flubalex and the highest concentration of Fusilade S caused expressed embryonic mortality. The developmental anomalies did not show a dose-dependent effect in any of the test series.

Key words: Flubalex, Fusilade S, Maloran 50 WP, herbicides, teratogenicity, chicken embryo, interaction


Acta Veterinaria Hungarica 44 (3), pp. 377–-387 (1996)

THE EFFECT OF PHENYL MERCURY ON REPRODUCTIVE PERFORMANCE IN LAYING HENS

Jana PRIBILINCOVÁ2, Elena MARETTOVÁ1, J. KOŠUCKÝ 3 and M. MARETTA1

1Department of Anatomy and Histology, University of Veterinary Medicine, 041 81 Košice, Slovakia; 2Research Institute of Experimental Veterinary Medicine, Slovakia; 3Poultry Research Institute, Ivanka pri Dunaji, Slovakia

(Received January 22, 1996; accepted May 24, 1996)

The effect of phenyl mercury with and without selenium on the egg production of laying hens and on the fertility, hatchability and properties of eggs was studied. Mercury was administered via the feed at dosages of 5 ppm, 30 ppm, and 30 ppm Hg + 4 ppm Se, for 56 days. After two months, egg production decreased by 8.18% and 7.74% in hens fed 30 ppm Hg, and 30 ppm Hg + 4 ppm Se, respectively. Egg weight decreased in all experimental groups. In comparison to the controls, these results were highly significant (P < 0.01) in hens fed 30 ppm Hg and 30 ppm Hg + 4 ppm Se and significant (P < 0.05) between hens fed 5 ppm Hg and 30 ppm Hg. Fertility rate and hatchability were not affected. Mercury exposure did not affect egg shape, egg-white height, egg-shell hardness or yolk colour. Both egg-shell thickness and weight decreased in all experimental groups. In the group supplemented with selenium there was a non-significant improvement in egg production, hatchability and all qualitative properties of eggs in comparison with the group without selenium supplementation. Residual mercury levels in egg yolk greatly surpassed the level found in the egg white: the highest values were measured in the group fed 
30 ppm Hg. The addition of selenium had a protective effect upon residual Hg deposits in the yolk, but not in the egg-white.

Key words: Phenyl mercury, reproductive performance, laying hens


Acta Veterinaria Hungarica 44 (3), pp. 389–-394 (1996)

RESTRICTION SITE MAPPING OF A BOVINE ADENOVIRUS TYPE 10 STRAIN

Katalin Matiz1,2, Mária Benkő1*, Z. Zádori1 and B. Harrach1

1Veterinary Medical Research Institute, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H–1581 
Budapest, P.O. Box 18, Hungary; 2Veterinary Institute of Debrecen, H–4002 Debrecen, P.O. Box 51, Hungary

Physical maps of the genome of a bovine adenovirus (BAV) type 10 strain (isolate Belfast1) were constructed for eight restriction enzymes. The size of the viral genome was estimated to be around 29,800 base pairs (bp). The orientation of the maps was determined on the basis of partial DNA sequences of the clonedPstI/D fragment of Belfast1. This work is an introduction to DNA sequence and phylogenetic analysis of BAV-10 in order to clarify its taxonomic place.

Key words: Bovine adenovirus type 10, restriction enzymes, physical maps

*Corresponding author: E-mail: benko@novell.vmri.hu;Fax: +36-1-252-1069